Monthly Archive:: May 2019

Rocketman Is a Blast of a Musical Biopic

Some moviegoers had understandable fears about someone adapting the life and career of Elton John for the big screen, especially when that someone would be Dexter Fletcher, the uncredited director called in to salvage Bohemian Rhapsody. Unlike the Queen biopic, however, Rocketman finds more personal and fantastical sweet spots in using its subject’s emotional and unforgettable music to tell his story and offers as much bright flash as fiery drama. It’s also incredibly fearless when it comes to tackling...

Godzilla: King of the Monsters Rules with a Roar

The thing about legends, mythology, and, by extension fandom, is they require some buy-in from the audience. Mythic stories, while interesting individually, aren’t intended to function as one-off tales. The bulk of their power—whether it rests on cultural, Jungian, or nostalgic foundations—comes from the larger universe of story that encircles each particular tale. Hollywood has understood this, to a limited extent, for almost a hundred years. But since the success of the Marvel Cinematic Universe and the increasing competition...

We Are the Perfect Girl Is a Perfect Modern Retelling of Cyrano de Bergerac

When it comes to modern adaptations, I can get a little stingy and critical with how the original material is handled and how well it translates and is received by a modern audience. For example, I’m a huge fan of the YouTube miniseries The Lizzie Bennet Diaries, because the producers and writers were able to keep Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice characters true to the original novel while putting an interactive spin on the story line, allowing viewers to...

A Plague Tale: Innocence Offers a Grim Journey through France

France in the Middle Ages is often portrayed as a lovely place with knights and tournaments, feasts and well-manicured rose gardens. Don’t expect to see any of that here. A Plague Tale: Innocence is about Amicia de Rune, a 15-year-old girl, daughter to a nobleman, who lives a quiet life in an estate with her family. One day the Inquisition comes knocking, seeking Hugo, her five-year-old brother. Things go sideways, and Amicia and Hugo are forced to flee for...

Comics I’m Picking Up the Week of May 29, 2019

Here are the books I’m looking forward to seeing at my local comic store the week of May 29, 2019. Dog Days of Summer Publisher: DC Comics Words/Story: G. Willow Wilson, Joshua Williamson, Mariko Tamaki, Dan DiDio, Collin Kelly, Jackson Lanzing, and others Art/Colors: Stejpan Sejic, Tom Raney, Cully Hamner, Kyle Hotz, Cian Tormey, and others “‘Who let the dogs out?’ DC does this summer as we unleash the beast within and join Krypto and Superman; Bat-Cow and Batman;...

Potemayo Is an Adorably Quirky Take on the Moe Subgenre

Imagine waking up one morning, as you do every single day. You walk down to the kitchen to get yourself a quick bite to eat before you head off to work or school. But when you open the refrigerator, you are stunned to find a pint-sized fairylike creature with cat ears and a tiny body squirming about amongst your eggs and milk. Even stranger, the mysterious creature instantly takes a shine to you, and the two of you are...

Iowa’s DemiCon Has Been Delighting Con-Goers for 30 Years

According to legend, it all began in 1989 in Des Moines, Iowa, with Jennette and Les Roth. They posted signs advertising the first meeting of the Des Moines Science Fiction Society, and at that first gathering, 10 people showed up, all asking when the first convention would be. That requested convention, DemiCon 1 (for Des Moines Convention), was held April 23–25, 1990. It stuck around. May 3–5, 2019, marked a milestone weekend for the convention, as DemiCon 30 (theme:...

This Week in Geek (5/27/19–6/2/19)

Welcome to This Week in Geek, your guide to events of interest to the Minnesota geek community for the week of Monday, May 27, to Sunday, June 2. Museum of the Moon What: Educational, Science & Technology When: May 21–June 9 Where: Bell Museum (University of Minnesota) It’s been 50 years since the first moon landing, and the Bell Museum is commemorating that momentous event with an installation featuring a 7-meter-diameter sculpture of the moon. Using detailed satellite images...

Sincerely, Harriet Is the Best Kind of Graphic Novel for Kids

It’s 1996 in Chicago, and Harriet Flores is bored. Not just bored, but bored. It’s summer vacation, but since she and her parents just moved to Chicago, she has no friends from school. Her parents are busy with trying to get situated in their new jobs, so she can’t even explore the city. The only person around is Pearl, their landlady who lives downstairs, and she’s old enough to have grandchildren. It’s not a situation most 13-year-olds would envy....

Hashtag: Danger Effortlessly Fits AHOY Comics’ Niche

Before I came across Hashtag: Danger, my only knowledge of AHOY Comics was the news that they were releasing the recently cancelled Jesus-themed DC comic Second Coming, written by Mark Russell. In fact, it was only through reading the editor’s notes in Hashtag: Danger that I discovered AHOY stands for “asshole of the year,” and with that knowledge, I can see this as a perfect example of the comics they want to release. If you want a serious comic,...
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