Tagged diversity

The Latest Black Panther Trailer Is Us

By now, you likely have seen Marvel’s latest trailer for Black Panther—if you haven’t, I strongly recommend that you take a few minutes and rectify that immediately. The anticipation for this release is due as much to the gripping visuals and ensemble cast as it is to the fact that this is only Marvel’s second superhero film in which the primary protagonist is black (the first, of course, being the woefully overlooked and underrated Blade). It is shaping up...

Please Stop Using Creators of Color to Defend Representation Problems

Once upon a time, there was a little girl in an all-pink bedroom who spent her Saturday mornings watching cartoons and eating multicolored cereal. One morning in particular was interrupted by an epic guitar riff and a battle for equality between humans and mutants. She was awestruck by the program, but what made her heart skip a beat was the appearance of a woman known as Storm: Mistress of the Elements. Up until that point, the girl hadn’t seen...

Brotherman Meets Hancock Meets Green Lantern in The Legend of the Mantamaji

At first glance, Eric Dean Seaton’s Legend of the Mantamaji may look like a typical comic-book story, complete with pencil-thin-mustached villain, a seemingly formulaic world-ending plot, and a reluctant Black hero . . . and if you merely skim the book, that’s probably what you’d see. But you’d be wrong. Below the surface is a cornucopia of subtle messages and plot devices that reveal this series to be more—so much more. For a little background, if you were reading comic...

The Story of the Lone Black Kid and Why #29DaysOfBlackCosplay Rocks

Last year, a hashtag surfaced throughout social media that showed the majesty that is the black cosplayer. Every day, all throughout the month of February—completely intentional month choice, by the way—#28DaysOfBlackCosplay soared through the skies to proudly display cosplayers of color. Many people took part, and it received all sorts of coverage, but to me the best part about the movement was the number of black cosplayers who hadn’t stepped out before finally throwing on that costume and wearing...

Why Halloween Season Can Be a Downer for Black Cosplayers

It’s almost Halloween! Every cosplayer’s favorite, or least favorite, season. We spend most of the year constructing costumes, but when it comes to preparing for the day where everyone wears a costume . . . sometimes we’re not quite sure what to do. But this article isn’t about that. Honestly, it was going to be, but then a pattern started to develop. Halloween—no, the entire month of October and even the months surrounding it—is becoming many black cosplayers’ most...

From Diversity to Community in Geekdom and Convention Spaces

I remember the first time I was invited to join friends CONvergence, the sci-fi and fantasy convention near the Twin Cities. I had barely dipped my feet into the shallow end of the geekdom waters. I had gone head over heels for Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog and Firefly. Futurama became my go-to show for laughs and comfort. However, when I was invited to attend CONergence with friends, my immediate instinct was to say no (I didn’t, but more on that...

Rebooting the Black & White Past with KodaChrome Future, Part 3: The Bronze Age of Comics

Previously: “Rebooting the Black & White Past with KodaChrome Future, Part 2: The Silver Age of Comics” The comic book Bronze Age is perhaps the most aptly or ironically named period because it had the widest range of introductions: the first black superhero to have his own comic book (Luke Cage), the first black female superhero (Storm), DC comics’s first (Black Racer) and second (Green Lantern) black superheroes, and others.  The 1970’s ushered in a new era of both...

Rebooting the Black & White Past with KodaChrome Future, Part 2: The Silver Age of Comics

Previously:  “Rebooting the Black & White Past with KodaChrome Future, Part 1: The Golden Age of Comics” It would take nearly 20 years after the debut of Superman before the first black comic book main character was introduced. Still maintaining the “mysterious and noble savage” stereotype, Waku, Prince of the Bantu was featured in the omnibus, Jungle Tales, from Marvel Comics’s 1950’s predecessor Atlas Comics. The seven-issue series, Jungle Tales (Sept. 1954 – Sept. 1955), which introduced Marvel’s first African hero, was renamed and continued as Jann of...
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