Tagged horror

The Brothers Paranormal Is a Thrilling and Multilayered Asian American Ghost Story

With their coproduction of Prince Gomolvilas’s The Brothers Paranormal, Theater Mu and Penumbra Theatre have brought a must-see performance that sets a high bar for intercultural speculative theater. Directed by Lou Bellamy and billed as a “darkly comic chiller,” the play goes far beyond that description as it unfolds into a stirring adventure involving two Thai American ghost-hunting brothers with dubious qualifications for their calling. At turns horrifying and moving, profound and endearing, it sees the titular Brothers Paranormal...

The Curse of la Llorona Lacks Spirit

I’ve been bingeing a lot of the Supernatural lately. So much that it is a race to finish the entire run in time to conclude the final 15th season with the rest of the real-time fans. One of the charms of that show is how it manages to simultaneously reference, honor, and have fun with the horror genre all in the same program. There are enough weirdo references to reward lifelong genre fans and enough wit to keep it...

The Haunting of Henderson Close Fills the Bill for a Spooky Ghost Story

Because I am a sucker for a plot line with a spooky ghost story, I was drawn to The Haunting of Henderson Close. I was not disappointed at all. Many years ago, a street in Edinburgh named Henderson Close was closed and then built over. Due to the unique nature of the area, it has become a tourist attraction where our protagonist, Hannah, serves as a tour guide, showing people the nooks and crannies of the old street. One...

Jordan Peele’s Us Is Smart, Silly, Scary, and Sophisticatedly Surreal

If Get Out wasn’t enough to convince you that Jordan Peele has a brilliant eye for horror, his latest production, Us, firmly solidifies him among the greatest of directors. His new film is brimming with brilliant staging, clever design, and a level of snark that always keeps the audience engaged in the film’s strange and disturbing nature. There’s a certain playful energy to Us, which functions as an intricate story worth deciphering in its many allegories and assemblies as...

Rob Guillory’s Farmhand Proves You Really Can’t Go Home Again

A Louisiana farmer named Jedidiah receives a vision giving him the information to grow and harvest human organs. His children, Zeke and Andrea, who left the farm years ago, returns upon his request to help him take care of things. The farm is now a super-high-tech, booming business that gives organic transplants to people in need. But with that success come malicious adversaries trying to steal Jed’s work. Unfortunately for Zeke and Andrea, Jed may not be as guiltless...

Overlord Reanimates a Dead Genre

If you told me a year ago that I would be walking through the rain to see a late-night screening of a World War II zombie movie, I would scoffed and gone back to researching New Zealand immigration laws. Things change, of course, and the great thing about movies is that all it takes is one or two totally solid ones to shift the landscape and kick off another trend. As easy as it is to disparage the entertainment...

Suspiria Spills Over with Stimulating Shocks

Luca Guadagnino’s Suspiria is every bit as twisted, stylish, and violent as its 1977 counterpart. In the same way that David Gordon Green’s Halloween is a faithful throwback of the John Carpenter classic, Guadagnino adheres greatly to the creepy uneasiness that made Dario Argento’s original film such a nightmarish trip. And while the film is sure to be deeply polarizing for going insane with its panic, terror, and gore, the boldness of its insanity makes it all the more...

City of Ghosts Is a Perfect October Ghost Story

In October, I often get in the mood for a ghost story. City of Ghosts, a spooky middle grade fiction book by Victoria Schwab, fit the bill for me. It is the story of Cassidy Blake, who has the ability to see ghosts and to visit the realm of spirits. Her parents are paranormal investigators who relocate to Edinburgh, Scotland, to film a television show about haunted cities. Her best friend happens to be a ghost named Jacob. Once they...

Hereditary’s Roots Run Deep into Horror

Some time ago I happened to be working on a horror film directed by a name filmmaker. The day’s pages concerned a séance in an old house; none of this was interesting at a basic level, of course, because séances are a long-standing trope, but this particular instance was curious because the director demanded a closed set for the scene. A “closed set” means only key crew are allowed during the shoot, usually reserved for sex scenes or nudity...

Who Gets Excluded from the Gender Commentary of Sleeping Beauties and The Power

This fall, the books Sleeping Beauties by Stephen and Owen King and The Power by Naomi Alderman were released. Both make an attempt at viewing what the world is like for women by depicting plagues that affect them while leaving men (mostly) unharmed. This is not a new mechanism in genre literature, with the popular comic Y: The Last Man being a prime example of earlier explorations of a gender-based malady. However, the basis of these two novels, an illumination of inequality...
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!