Tagged science fiction

Babylon 5 Is an Iconic, Groundbreaking Piece of TV Sci-Fi History

My exposure to Babylon 5 came many years after its original mid-’90s broadcast, when it aired nightly on SyFy (then Sci Fi) in the early 2000s. Initially, it was my father who became obsessed with the show and insisted my mother and I would love it just as much. He was right. We taped every episode and eagerly discussed the plot at dinner. As soon as the DVDs were released, we bought them. We stocked up on the books,...

5 Awesome Anthology Shows to Binge-Watch Right Now

“The Golden Age of Television” is a phrase that has been thrown around with almost reckless abandon since the dark ages before streaming. I’d argue that every decade has had examples of phenomenal programming, as well as some that has been . . . not so great. The ’80s mastered the art of the Saturday-morning cartoon. The ’90s gave us dozens of fantastic and truly groundbreaking sitcoms. The early aughts saw the cable networks prove that the small screen...

Minicon Proves There’s Life after Bloomington

Minicon 53, which was held March 30 through April 1, 2018, was especially notable in two ways. First, it was the 50th anniversary of the first convention (there were two in 1971 and two in 1974, which is why we’re on convention 53). And second, it saw the convention leave the DoubleTree Bloomington, otherwise known as the Radishtree for its past as a Radisson and a Sheraton, for the DoubleTree Park Place in St. Louis Park. The guests of...

Annihilation Is a Refraction of Itself

Short review first: this is not the movie you think it is. Not in a The Last Jedi sort of way, but more in a The Thin Red Line sort of way. The marketing might make you believe Annihilation is something like Predator except with some really, really fucked-up monsters. Well, my friends, I am sad to say it is not. Let us rewind all the way back to the ancient year of 2000 AD. Among the many things...

The X-Files Returns, But Can We Really Go Home Again?

I’m having trouble writing this preview, because I’m not excited. When it was announced about three years ago that The X-Files was coming back for another season, it was exciting—finally, a chance for the iconic show of the ’90s to deliver the answers it had promised. The moment was nigh for redemption from the disasters that were seasons 8 and 9 and the second motion picture. I was giddy that finally I could discuss my favorite show without the...

Minnesota Conventions for Cosplay in 2018

As we kick off the new year, have you started cosplanning your cosplays for 2018? Twin Cities Geek is here to help with a comprehensive list of conventions and a few other select events in Minnesota you might be interested in cosplaying at in 2018. Click on the convention’s name to visit its website, which will have the most current information on dates, registration prices, guest appearances, cosplay contests, and more! (Note that events other than conventions are listed separately...

Who Gets Excluded from the Gender Commentary of Sleeping Beauties and The Power

This fall, the books Sleeping Beauties by Stephen and Owen King and The Power by Naomi Alderman were released. Both make an attempt at viewing what the world is like for women by depicting plagues that affect them while leaving men (mostly) unharmed. This is not a new mechanism in genre literature, with the popular comic Y: The Last Man being a prime example of earlier explorations of a gender-based malady. However, the basis of these two novels, an illumination of inequality...

Artemis Is Lighthearted Sci-Fi Entertainment from the Author of The Martian

In 2014, Andy Weir’s self-published book The Martian was picked up by a major publisher. Just a year and a half later, it was a major motion picture starring Matt Damon that went on to gross over $630 million. Given that history, it’s not too surprising that Fox bought the film rights to Weir’s newest book, Artemis, months before it was even published. The new novel tells the story of Jasmine “Jazz” Bashara, a 20-something petty criminal born and...

John Carpenter’s Tales of Science Fiction Offers Excellent Art and Familiar Tropes

John Carpenter is a man of many trades. In addition to being a film director, writer, and composer, though some may not know it, he’s also involved in the world of comics. Published by Storm King Comics, John Carpenter’s Tales of Science Fiction aims to be an anthology, with each limited series telling a contained story over a handful of issues. The first three-issue story is Vault, in which a mining vessel comes across a derelict alien ship in...

The Sci-Fi Poetry Books of the Year Feature Whales and Robots and the Apocalypse, Oh My!

Last month, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association announced the winners of the 2017 Elgin Awards for best collections of speculative poetry from the previous year. For those new to the term, speculative poetry has become a relatively common catch-all for poetry that embraces the imagination, including fantasy, science fiction, horror, and other similar genres. Some might be surprised at the excitement for these types of poetry, but the current US Poet Laureate, Tracy K. Smith, won a...
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