Tagged Science

In Gamifying the Language of Chemistry, CompoundIt! Is a Minnesota-Born Winner

In CompoundIt!, a board game created by Minneapolis science teacher Andrew Lyman-Buttler, chemistry and Scrabble-like mechanics join hands to create a uniquely geeky experience. The game—which is running a crowdfunding campaign through May 2, 2018—is billed as a “chemistry formula word game in which the ‘letters’ are chemical elements and the ‘words’ are compounds.” It challenges players to build binary compounds and polyatomic ions on the board from tiles representing individual elements. Lyman-Buttler describes his game as a “great new...

The Science of Star Trek: Discovery’s Mycelial Network

Warp drives, subspace networks, inertial dampeners, transporters, holodecks, universal translators, transparent aluminum. With Star Trek, the list of high-tech concepts and gadgets (both the more well-thought-out and grounded ideas and the slightly less realistic) is nearly endless. Now, thanks to the most recent iteration of the franchise, Star Trek: Discovery, words such as “spore drive” and “mycelial network” can be added to the list. Despite taking us to the past in terms of Trek canon, Star Trek: Discovery pushed us to look forward...

Time Travel Girl Is a Series You’ll Learn from and Have Fun Doing It

My unintentional time-travel theme continues with a short, sweet anime called Time Travel Girl. My husband and I ran across this series while trawling VRV (an anime streaming service that offers content from Crunchyroll, Funimation, and others), and while the series wasn’t earth-shattering, there were a lot of things we really enjoyed about it. The hero of Time Travel Girl is Mari Hayase, a young girl whose father has been missing for three years. Mari knows that her dad, Eiji, is...

Oumuamua, a Messenger from Afar, Pays a Visit to Our Cosmic Backyard

It is difficult to deny the enormity of space and the cosmos, the scale of which can make one feel immensely small—yet at the same time can fill one with a deep sense of wonder at it’s magnitude. As Carl Sagan described, “our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark.” Despite the grandiosity of the space that surrounds our small planet, we continue to seek deeper meaning and to unravel the mysteries that have puzzled...

Adam Savage and Michael Stevens Satiate the Mind with Brain Candy Live

For generations, being interested in science made you an outcast—forced into the depths of basement laboratories, backyard telescopes, and dusty library sections. But over time, popular science started to break through to the masses, with shows like Mr. Wizard, Beakman’s World, and Bill Nye the Science Guy. The last decade in particular has seen a science boom in what is cool, thanks in large part to Mythbusters on television and Vsauce on the interwebs. So in some ways, it’s only natural that hosts...

At a Crossroads between Art and Science, GLITCH Finds a Place to Thrive

At the corner of Riverside and 19th Avenue in Minneapolis, nestled above the recently reopened Viking Bar, sits the center of operations and home of the GLITCH family. Ascending the steps into the newly renovated suite housing the organization, I was instantly greeted by the cozy and open space comprising hardwood floors, brick walls, large windows, comfortable furniture, and scores of games—both digital and hobby—stacked on shelves surrounding a large television and entertainment center. I was then welcomed by...

Minnesota Researchers Use Lasers and Gold Nanotechnology to Advance Cryopreservation

From franchises such as Star Trek and Star Wars to films like Sleeper and Forever Young, cryonics—the preservation of individual life by freezing the body—is a fairly regular plot device in popular culture. But whereas large-scale cryonics is often seen as the stuff of science fiction, cryopreservation—the process of preserving biological tissue, cells, or organs by cooling them to very low temperatures—is actually a scientific reality and the subject of continuing research in numerous fields. Recently, a team of researchers from the University of...

When, Where, and How to See the 2017 Total Eclipse in Minnesota

Monday, August 21, will bring us the first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in the United States in 99 years. While not incredibly uncommon generally—total solar eclipses can be seen from Earth every couple of years—this one is special to us, as it will cut diagonally across the entirety of the United States. Knowing the significance of this upcoming eclipse is one thing, but knowing the science behind it is another. For that, Twin Cities Geek turned to Evan Tyler, a...

Crafters, Artists, and Techies Come Together for the St. Paul Public Libraries’ Maker Fest

It is often said that our society is consumer driven, or that we live in a consumerist culture, increasingly dependent on things we can buy rather than things we can create on our own. Despite this, a growing countermovement persists. Referred to as maker culture, this movement not only seeks to build community of tinkerers, builders, artists, and general DIYers but to demonstrate and give others the tools to become makers themselves. Locally, furthering momentum in the growing maker movement...

5 Kinds of People Who Don’t Get Vaccines But Aren’t Anti-Vaxxers

The cases of measles in Minnesota have grown to 32, and as someone who has a hereditary rubella vaccine allergy, I’m worried. The measles and mumps vaccines are no longer available separately, which means that I have only had one dose of the MMR vaccine—the dose that almost killed me as a baby. Basically, I am probably not immune. So if you like having geeky science and technology articles from this nice person, please get vaccinated, as I could...
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